Archive

Archive for the ‘Blog’ Category

Mapping the 2017 local elections in Scotland #council17

April 18th, 2017 No comments

I’ve always been an anorak around elections – it’s probably more about the numbers than the politics and Single Transferable Vote (STV) elections are as entertaining as they come. I’m enthusiastic about STV from a democratic perspective also, because it encourages a less tribal form of voting mentality. Political choices are complex and it makes sense that you can find policies to support across a spectrum of parties or prospective politicians. To be honest, I’m not a party political type of person, I prefer to stay untethered to party interests, so the notion of a party list vote (as in part of the Scottish parliament elections and the entirety of the European parliament vote in Scotland), where you are voting for a single party and not even a person, is an uncomfortable form of democratic process for me.

However, every 5 years, Scotland gets a shot at a Single Transferable Vote election in the council elections here. Turnout is generally low, so I’m keen to do what I can to encourage voters to engage with this election in the hope that it will promote the suitability of STV for other elections in Scotland. Having seen the wonderful visualisations made available for the snap Assembly election in the north of Ireland in March 2017, I was keen to implement something similar for the Scottish local elections in May 2017. It would be a challenge, not just because it would be like #AE17 times 32 since each council election is effectively a mini-assembly with wards for constituencies with multiple seats in each ward, but I also soon discovered that there is no detailed aggregated election data for the two previous STV elections in Scotland (2007 & 2012). Each council has a statutory responsibility to publish results in PDF form on their websites, so that means the data for Scotland is spread across 32 councils in a whole variety of different layouts to a varying degree of detail.

This same scatter-gun approach to presentation of data affects the candidate data also, with the formal statutory documents called “Statement of Persons Notified” (SOPNs) being the main source of information about who is standing where. Again each council publishes these independently in slightly varying formats. Fortunately some grassroots democracy enthusiasts rally round the Democracy Club website to painstakingly go through each SOPN (across the UK) to create a single source of candidate data for elections. Not long after the 32 SOPNs were published in Scotland, the Democracy Club had collated the information on each SOPN into a complete set of candidate data. I saw there was still a gap to fill in presenting this data in an accessible form, so I took the framework used by @electionsNI and adapted it to the Scottish candidate data.

Where the lack of joined-up resources for election data was frustrating, the tools and resources available to work with boundary mapping is a different story altogether. This was my first venture into programming with map data and I was pleasantly surprised to find out how easy it is to work with, given all the freely available and well-designed resources you can use. Here are some of the resources I used to put together the mapping website.

  1. The Local Government Boundary Commission for Scotland publishes each council area as shapefile data packages, which is the raw material for GIS software applications.
  2. There is an open source application QGIS which you can use to load and manipulate these shapefile packages. It’s really easy to use – the ZIP files containing the shapefile data can be loaded directly.
  3. Most web-based mapping applications will need to read boundary data in latitude/longitude form stored in a GEOJSON datafile. THe Lat/Long coordinates standard used is technically referred to in GIS applications as EPSG:4326 (European Petroleum Survey Group). To extract this from QGIS, you load the shapefile ZIP package and then right-click its layer description and select Save As…. Choose GEOJSON as the output format and EPSG:4326 as the CRS (Coordinate Reference System), then browse for your output filename and click OK to create the GEOJSON file.
  4. The data from these boundary shapefiles can be very very large, particularly the coastal council areas, where every twist and turn along the coast and every little island must be mapped as polygons made of little straight lines from one point to the next. The likes of Orkney, Shetland or the Western Isleas were over 10Mbytes in size once the GEOJSON was extract from QGIS. Fortunately there is a fabulous online application called Map Shaper to effortlessly simplify this map data as we only need approximate boundaries for this application. Map Shaper can take several different data formats as input including GEOJSON with EPSG:4326 coordinates, so once the data is loaded, you can just select Simplify and use a slider to take the data accuracy from 100% down to the lowest level that preserves the general gist of the boundaries. Typically with could be anywhere from 8% to 2%, which yield great reductions in filesizes. Achieving this trade-off between mapping precision and file size is vital to building a website that is quick to present the maps and respond to user input.
  5. The framework implemented by @electionsNI made use of the Leaflet javascript module, which is a lightweight mapping library linked to Mapbox and OpensSreetMap.

The website http://council17.mulvenna.org went live at about 1am on Sun 16 April 2017 and was an instant hit with users, grateful at last to get a clear picture of who was standing where in the council election. The site was accessed by 10,000 unique IP addresses in the first 24 hours. I’m continuing to add features to the site in the run-up to the election on 4 May 2017.

“Rutherglen South is in the north-west of South Lanarkshire, which is to the east of East Ayrshire…”

Categories: Blog Tags:

Scotland, like a life-long smoker contemplating quitting

February 22nd, 2014 No comments

It struck me, the other day, that the Independence Referendum debate in Scotland feels like the internal dialogue in the head of a life-long smoker. Plenty of information detailing the benefits of kicking the habit is calling out to you, but you blot it all out by convincing yourself “I like smoking”, “it helps me relax”, “I can’t really see me stopping”, “I’ve always done it”, “I like to hang with all the cool people in the smoking zone” and countless other delusions you use to avoid making that leap of faith in your own will power and taking responsibility for your future. Once upon a time you reckoned you were a smoker and you were going to stay a smoker, but now you’re not too sure. You’re swithering – your kids are nipping your head about it almost daily now and for the first time, you can actually see yourself in a smoke-free future.

Alternative visions for Scotland

Alternative visions for Scotland

 

Clearly this analogy is a product of my own pro-Independence position and the fact that I decided to stop smoking earlier this month. It certainly paints the No campaign in a tongue-in-cheek unhealthy light, but I think it resonates with the current state of the referendum campaign. I believe we’re approaching a 50-50 tilting point in voting intentions and the momentum is only going in one direction: towards YES. The lifelong smoker is actually swithering – he or she can do this. It’s only really the fear of change and the path of least resistance that is stopping you. Smoking isn’t offering any life-enhancing vision for the future. There are so many reasons to ring the changes. It won’t be easy and there might be the odd slip-up in the transition, but a confidence is growing that a change of lifestyle is within your grasp.

Should Scotland be a non-smoker? On 18th September 2014, I’m voting YES.

The Ulster Covenant: part of my heritage?

September 29th, 2012 4 comments

I’m an Irishman from Belfast currently living in Scotland. I have to admit that I’ve never really understood what exactly being British means, but there are probably half a million people in Ireland, for whom that is the national identity they feel most comfortable with.

On this day 100 years ago, half a million people lined up across the north of Ireland and beyond to sign the Ulster Covenant. A little dig around my family history reveals a mixture of catholic and presbyterian ancestry, so some of those covenanters were family of mine. I had a look at the PRONI archive to see how many I could spot.
Ulster Covenant (men) Read more…

Categories: Blog, Genealogy Tags:

A Blast From The Past

September 11th, 2012 No comments

Car bomb rocks Drumsurn villageOn Thursday 26 July 1973, loyalists exploded a car bomb outside my uncle’s pub in the small village of Drumsurn, Co. Derry. Although I was only six, I remember it quite well as we were visiting at the time. I was staying the night upstairs above the pub with 3 of my siblings and half a dozen or more cousins. Luckily there were no serious casualties.

Recently I was curious to find out the exact timing and circumstances of the bomb attack and had a look through the newspapers of the time at Belfast Central Library. I could find no coverage of the blast in any of the Belfast or Derry City newspapers – a car bomb in a rural village inflicting relatively minor injury and damage obviously struggled to compete for column inches with all the other stuff going on in the summer of 1973. Read more…

Categories: Blog, Genealogy Tags:

2016 Olympics conundrum for Northern Ireland’s top golfers

August 13th, 2012 No comments

Photo by Lauren Teague

Golf returns to the Olympics in 2016, last appearing in 1904 where only two countries were represented (Canada and the USA). The International Golf Federation have proposed the following eligibility scheme to determine which of the world’s top golfers will challenge for Olympic medals in Rio:

The IGF is recommending an Olympic field of 60 players for each of the men’s and women’s competition, utilizing the official world golf rankings as a method of determining eligibility. The top 15 world-ranked players would be eligible for the Olympics, regardless of the number of players from a given country. Beyond the top 15, players would be eligible based on world ranking, with a maximum of two available players from each country that does not already have two or more players among the top 15.

Currently golf’s top 15 male players are drawn from the USA (9), England (3), Northern Ireland (2) and Australia (1). It may look different in four years’ time, but wherever they are ranked, Northern Ireland’s top golfers will face a unique and delicate choice between TeamGB and Ireland. We might see pragmatism or friendship put before personal feelings of national identity. Read more…

Categories: Blog Tags: , ,

Exporting “Safe Senders” from Windows Live Mail

March 20th, 2012 No comments

This note relates to Windows Live Mail version 2009 (Build 14.0.8117.0416) running in Windows XP.

I found it impossible to export or copy ‘n’ paste the Safe Senders the addresses from Tools->Safety Options in my Windows Live Mail. I wanted to do this to import the list to the server-based Junk Mail filter provided by my email host.

A bit of digging about in the registry exposed the location of the Safe Senders list as


[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows Live Mail\PerPassportSettings\0\Junk Mail\Safe Senders List]

Unfortunately each address is saved in a separate registry subkey, so a bit of text manipulation is required after exporting the above Registry key to a .REG file. I used Edit-Plus to sort the file, strip out the non-pertinent stuff and perform a find-and-replace on the lines containing the email addresses, which are of the format


"Exception"="goodfriend@gmail.com"

Categories: Blog, Technomancy Tags: